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Exploring Street Signs

Do you notice street signs? I do.

Likely there are the option to buy old street signs, when they are decommissioned in your area too. That would be an easier, and legitimate way to get them. Any well known streets would be expensive. You could get lucky and find the street you lived on for a bargain price.

I wonder if anyone has collected the same street name in every vintage style? That would be an interesting collection. Possibly a small collection in a small town or a very large collection in the big cities where signs are changed out often for this or that reason.

The “acorn” street-name sign is as much a Toronto icon as are City Hall or the CN Tower. Though the design has graced the streets of many municipalities across Ontario and elsewhere for nearly 70 years, it’s thoughts of our city that it conjures up for many people. Its versatility allowed neighbourhoods and business improvement […]

Source: A Short History of Toronto’s Street Signs | cityscape | Torontoist

Cityscapes on Rings

I really like the idea of these but I really can’t afford to buy one. Besides, I’m Canadian. I could come up with my own design and turn it into an ASCII art image. It’s something I would like to do but haven’t started yet.

If you happen to be from one of these cities you may want to get a ring. Most locations were the US and Europe.

ringscitiesSource: View City by Shekhtwoman on Etsy

Ruins Meets Modern

My favorite style of design is when the very old meets the new. It’s like the industrial lofts in Downtown LA that still maintain some of the classical building elements.

Organica Arquitectura in Lisbon took a ruined stone house in Portugal and integrated a brand new modern house. The combination of the old and new couldn’t be more perfect.

I feel that it’s important to maintain older beautiful structures and restore them when possible. It maintains the history and gives a new building so much personality. This is my idea of perfect design.

via Ruins Meets Modern «.

Ruins in New York

As seen on a post in Design Corner: One misty morning while in New York City, take a cab uptown to West 64th Street in Manhattan. When you reach the Riverside park, observe a dark undulating skeleton sticking out of the Hudson River. The twisted metallic construction that stimulates comparisons with Frank Gehry’s architecture has been there since 37 years ago. Before Pier D was consumed by raging fire in 1971, it was a part of the New York Central Railroad Yard. Today Pier D is the kind of design form that quite literally follows the function – chronologically leaving its original practicalities behind in the smoke of Manhattan’s industrial past. Back then, Pier D’s utility was to be used as a deck for longshoremen to unload bulk cargo. Now Pier D is all about emotional significance – it serves no purpose other than the aesthetic one. However, the official confirmation of the site’s new aesthetic status was issued no earlier than in 2003 – through a timely gesture of Adrian Benepe, the parks commissioner who has been known for his protective stances vis-à-vis the city’s natural and historic beauty. He was called on the phone one day to be put on notice that a crane had begun dismantling the pier – according to approved plans deliberated and finalized in Benepe’s absence. The commissioner rushed to the site and ordered to stop the demolition.Accidental landscape design… In the opinion of a nearby dweller, since the arrival of Trump Place “everything looks so new here, […] we need a reminder of what it was like 80 years ago.”

WebUrbanist

WebUrbanist – blog collective writers are interested in all things urban – from urban design to subversive art and strange architecture. We scour the net to find neat new stuff then boil that information down and pack it into an article with relevant images and links, as exhaustive as we can manage on a single subject area. Our team is comprised of web designers, bloggers, architects and other curious urbanists.